Tag Archives: art

Light Box Soldering Part I

So in my last post, I talked about some of the projects in which I’ve used reinforcing wires to add strength and support to the soldering lines, and I’ve started the process of adding in this support to my green and grey light box.  Here are a few photos to show you what I’m doing.  And don’t get me wrong, I’m making this up as I go along.  If anyone has suggestions for a better method, definitely let me know!

When planning where I want reinforcement, I thought about it in terms of adding strength, as well as providing a stop-gap for solder along all the edges of this lamp.  So I knew I need wire along every edge.  In the end, I decided to cut four pieces of wire and then bend them to fit — one piece of wire would start at the bottom of the lamp, run up a corner edge, run along one side of the top edge between the side and top panels, and then overlap about an inch back down the next corner edge.  I started with the one-inch overlap part, thinking it would likely be easier to fit a longer, more maneuverable piece of wire overtop of that piece afterwards:

Starting with the one-inch section on all four corners left me with long ‘arms’ that I would bend and solder as I went along:

Four pieces of wire

After placing in all four pieces of wire, I began to bend and solder them along the top edge, working one at a time.  I spot-soldered the edge to keep the wire in place.  The spot-soldering allowed me to bend the wire in each section to keep it as tight to the corner as possible and when I go back to add a finish solder bead along these edges, it will help keep the wire from popping back up as the solder melts along.  On the left corner, you can see where the wire I’ve just soldered and the wire intended for the next edge intersect:

Spot solder along the top edgeFrom there I bent the length of the wire to follow the side corner along to the bottom edge.  The point here is that it will overlap and help cover the next one inch section so that when I apply a finish solder bead, everything gets covered evenly.  I guess I will have to see how this theory will work out for my next post:

In the picture above, you can see a pretty sizeable gap between the side and top panel, and the wire helps add bulk to fill this in so that it’s not just solder doing this job.  From there, the wire that was just bent around the corner was soldered into the side-side edge, again as tight as possible.  The next wire (the one sticking out the right side of the photo) will be bent around to the side-top edge, the same way I’ve just described above.  And so on until all four sides are done.  Up next?  Adding a wire ring around the bottom edge and applying a finish solder bead to all the edges.

 

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Send In the Reinforcements

In my recent post about my green and grey light box project, I got to the point of having the panels spot-soldered soldered together and in a basic 3D form.  This post, I’m going to talk about my use of reinforcing wire in my projects, as that’s the next step for my light box project.  

Using reinforcement is something that I’ve started doing in my work partly from functional necessity and partly for aesthetics, although really the aesthetic aspect also adds function regardless.  The first lamp I added reinforcements to was the hanging lamp I designed and built for my mom.  I wanted some additional structure on the inside so that all the long strips would stay together and not pull apart (that’s a lot of straight lines).  I also wanted to add a wire reinforcement at the top and bottom edges to keep it in a circular shape.  There are four “circles” of support wire in this lamp: two at the top and bottom edges, and two that snake along (approximately) the top and bottom of the coloured squares, soldered to the inside of the lamp.

Lamp with Little Squares

The second lamp I used reinforcements in was the table lamp I built for my sweetheart. I needed to add a support that allowed me to add bulk and structure to the edges of the squares, as they didn’t fit perfectly together and I wasn’t keen on overlapping the edges very much — I wanted the corners to meet somewhat evenly.  I used reinforcing wire along the corner edges, sunken into the finish solder.  I also wanted to add some bulk to the finished edge at the top, instead of having a really flat, sharp edge.  So I used wire here too (wire everywhere!) to provide something to which I could adhere more solder and create a built up edge bead.

Prairie Gold Table Lamp

Since then, I’ve seen a few projects that have come back to me squished or broken, and have started incorporating wire into my smaller sun catchers (I’ve put support wire into these projects here and here).  They feel sturdier, and at least I know that someone really had to try hard to squish it if they return a project to me for repairs later!!

So that’s what’s up next.  I’m going to use a similar approach as the one I described for the table lamp above, but probably with a few extra pieces and some thinking about how to use longer pieces and bend them.  I’ll share an update and photos this weekend!

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Up next – another light box

When I designed the light box I’ve posted about recently, I used the design twice to create one light box in moody, shady tones and one in brighter, sharper colours (pictured below in teal, bright green, iridescent and textured glass).  Based on my last experiences trying to solder the panels on the last light box together, and having it be a bit of a mess, I’ve decided to pull all the pieces apart, re-foil them and solder them again new.  A bit of a pain in the butt, but I’m aiming for better quality results over less total working time with this one anyways.

Here are all my glass pieces pulled apart:

The next step will be to remove the existing (old) copper foil, clean off any residues and foil them over again, the same way I described in this post.

After that, I will need to assemble my panels and put everything together.  I designed to top panel when I was working on the grey-green light box, but the design was a little bit different because I only had a few small scraps of remaining glass to work with.  I still like the way everything kind of swirls at the top, though:

Light Box Top Panel

More posts to come on how this project progresses!

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Grey and Green Light Box

So last week I posted about some lamp panels I was refurbishing from my first attempt three years ago.  I worked on this lamp some more this week, and it’s starting to really take shape!  This week so far I’ve pieced together the top panel for this light box and spot-soldered the sides and top together to actually form the 3D shape.

These are the panels fitted together.  I designed just the four sides originally, but then later wanted to add a top panel.  The four sides were designed to have curving lines that continued and connected all the way around the lamp.  When I went to design the top panel, I essentially laid out the four side panels the way you see in the picture below, marked where all the solder lines hit at the top edge, and designed something that would connect all the pieces on top.

Panels fitted together

From here, I used tape and a really (very) poor tiny square tool as an approximate shape to hold the panels together so I could spot solder them.  When I actually have the time and space to get something else together, I want to make a proper 90 degree jig out of some plywood.  I have a few fantastic metal pieces that I can pin down to set up jig guides, but I don’t want to destroy this table too quickly!

Putting the side panels together

After the sides were spot soldered together, I placed the top panel on, in approximately the right location (I’ll be the first to admit that my sides were not 100% square and all the same lengths…), and spot soldered it down to add some structural integrity to this whole light box lamp thing…  I plan to reinforce all of the corners/edges with copper wire, so spot soldering is how this will be held together until then.

Spot soldering on the top panel

Once it was all together, I found a light bulb (probably the same size and warmth that I’ll use in the finished lamp) and stuck it underneath on the table to see approximately what the finished light box would look like… Pretty!  I like it on much better than off, which I think is a small failing on my part – normally I like to have some contrast between the glass in an unlit lamp to give it some definition and texture without relying completely on the light – in this piece I feel that the grey, grey-green and green are all similar in tone and saturation of colour and end up blending together a bit more than I would like.  Until you turn the light on!

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Then I think it looks great!  {I do have to note that for a light-box with a covered top, you should always use only a compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulb, because with a regular incandescent bulb, the fixture will get really hot and could burn someone or be a fire hazard.}  So next up?  Filling in the gaps and reinforcing the edges with copper, and final soldering and patina.

I’m not 100% sure how I am going to finish the base of this lamp, but I’m sure I will be able to come up with something.  I purchased an ikea lamp at the thrift store this past weekend, and I am planning to disassemble it and use the electrical parts to create something better (and prettier!)  Stay tuned for updates as this project progresses!

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A Little Fixer Up’er

I made a series of sun-catchers for family members one year, and this little hummingbird was one of them.  Sadly, he got squished and his wings fell off!  *sad face*  So as something I can do to finish a variety of projects I started (before moving on to new ones), I thought I would work on fixing up this sun-catcher with some improvements!  I talked about some of the steps I could take to fix this piece in an earlier post, and here they are in more detail and with pictures.

Step One:  Removing the broken wings.  Luckily the glass isn’t broken – the copper foil has just been pulled off the edges of the glass.  To remove the wings, I pulled them off with my hands, breaking the copper foil to remove them from the pieces.  {Just a note – use your judgement when doing this.  If it will pull other solder seams or otherwise make more trouble for you to fix, just melt everything off gently with the soldering iron.}  Then I melted the solder in the joint between the wing and body, using the soldering iron to push the remaining foil out of the way.

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Step Two:  Remove the old copper foil from both wing pieces.  I used a small exacto knife to help me scrape the copper foil off all edges of the wings.

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Step Three:  Cleaning the glass.  There is a sticky residue left over from the copper foil around the edges of the wing pieces.  To clean them, I put them into a sink of warm water with a small amount of dish soap.   I let the soak for a few minutes, then used an old rag to wipe off the sticky stuff on the edges of the glass.  Good as new and ready to be re-foiled and attached back on!

Sticky residue on edges of glass

Step Four: Re-apply copper foil.  I’m using a 1/4″ copper foil, partly because I’m out of 7/32″ and partly because I want there to be a solid border around these wing pieces.  Going to 3/16″ is not a great option for single pieces that will be attached by only a single solder joint.

Foiled wings

Step Five: Attaching the wings back onto the body.  I thought about why these wings came off in the first place, and a lot of it has to do with the fact that there isn’t a whole lot of structural connectivity between the body and the plane of the wing.  It was very easy for the wing to be bent upwards or downwards, and for the copper foil to pull away from the glass.  So I’m going to use some thin wire to help create more stability.  I’ve started incorporating wire supports into my work to add structural integrity and strength, so I think it’s not a bad idea here.  I’m going to bring a piece of wire from the middle line of the body across the front edge of the wing, and the same thing on the back – a piece of wire running from the middle seam of the body across the back edge of the wing.

Step Six: Soldering it all together.  This process takes some time, and it would be amazing if I had a third hand to keep it all together.  If you’re thinking about getting into stained glass, be prepared to constantly cut and burn your fingers.  The first step to make this process much easier was to apply a layer of solder on all edges of the wings separately before adding wire or attaching them to the body of the hummingbird.

I chose to solder the wire all the way around the wings, both because it created a more consistent line around the wings, and just adds strength, which is the point of this fix.  I spot-soldered the wire first and then went over it again to add a smooth edge.

The last steps in reattaching the wings were to attach the wire to the body joint, and then to cover it all with a heavy line of solder.  This is where the earlier step of applying a thin coat of solder all the way around the edges really helps out – the goal now is to create joints between the existing solder instead of trying to get into some really tight spaces with a soldering iron to get everything coated.

Step 7: Clean the piece and VOILA!  Good as new!

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How To: Make a Reverse Pattern From Pieces You Cut Out Three Years Ago

So, I think the title says it all…  I have a lot of glass from projects that I cut out years ago and put in containers (I honestly did think I would work on them much sooner than this!) with the intent to put them together into something beautiful!  Alas, I did not put any record of how the pieces were supposed to fit together into the container with them…  Most of these containers have been puzzled over and eventually just abandoned into the scrap pile to be used for other projects at some future date.  But I did find one envelope that had a few clues to help me put it back together!

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The envelope contained 17 pieces, and had the label “butterfly” on the outside.  So far, so good.  I know what I’m supposed to be piecing together.  With the contents of the envelope emptied, the real fun begins.  Moving the green and white pieces around brings back a memory of a butterfly pattern I made in 2007 (!!), so that is some help.  I have an idea of how it is supposed to fit.  And at last, another clue clicks!  Some of the pieces are numbered!  And one of them is labelled with a number 1.  A starting point!  From there, it becomes clear that there are some white pieces designed to be squiggly edges of wings, and some that fit next to the butterfly body.  The green pieces just fall into place in between – and once one wing is laid out, the next is just a mirror image!  I think I just got lucky…

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I grind up my pieces to get the fit just right, and clean and foil them up – ready to go!  But then I realize that I don’t have a pattern (thanks, love of getting rid of things I haven’t used in years + moving at least four times since I cut this glass), and it would be nice to replicate this butterfly for future projects, as it’s actually quite cute!  So I assemble the pieces in their full shape and trace an outline onto a piece of paper.

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The next step is to clear the pieces and then trace each piece individually.  I started with the body, because it’s clear where that one is supposed to go, and the rest of the pieces can be traced out based on their relative positions.  Next I moved outwards into the wings, tracing the basic edges of each piece, and lining up the next piece against the newly traced lines.

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Once I traced all the pieces, I had a basic outline of the butterfly and all the components of the wings.  To finish off the pattern, I traced it out with a thick sharpie marker, to connect all the lines and to make it easy to copy this pattern on the light table in the future.

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After that, time to finish the butterfly!  I have to say it’s not my best solder work, but it’s been three years and then some, so it’s not a bad start…  I have a rheostat on my soldering iron, and think the temperature may need some adjustment.  But that’s neither here nor there.  I finished my first project in three years!  Fly little butterfly!

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This workspace is for workin’

It may not be the most perfect space, but it’s enough for me to be able to have some dedicated space to set up a light table that doubles as a grinder station, and a table surface that I can cut and solder on, so it works for now!  Sadie likes to hang out and keep me company, and remind me every few hours to take a break and pay attention to her instead…

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The last couple of days, I’ve pulled out all my tools, picked up a couple of pieces that I was missing (rubber tips for my running pliers) and started getting back into the swing of cutting some glass!  It’s been awesome, and I’ve only cut myself twice.  So far.  It feels good to be back into it, though.  The work is repetitive and kind of therapeutic for that reason.  I put on an album and just get in the groove – it’s a good feeling to focus on something and be fully absorbed for a couple of hours.  I feel like I don’t do that a whole lot in other areas of things I take on.  I have two goals for the next little while: the first is to use up some of the smaller pieces and scrap glass I have in my  possession.  So here is my next lamp project to start using some up some of this material:

Cutting out glass pieces

The second goal I have is to fix up a couple of broken pieces and complete some stuff I started working on a couple years ago (seriously, it’s been that long!)  Number one on my list was a pretty little butterfly sun-catcher I made in a class a number of years ago.  On of the wire antennas fell off, so time to solder it back on – a nice easy fix!  {As an aside – I highly recommend taking a beginner class to brush up on some skills if you’re a hobbyist or been doing it for a couple of years without any instruction.  I’ve been making glass projects for years and a class gave me a couple easy tips and tricks that helped clean my work up a lot!  Hmmm… Maybe a topic for another post?}  Asides aside, here is my good-as-new butterfly:

Glass Butterfly

 

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A Little Bit of Painting

Painting is something I’ve always enjoyed, and endeavoured to do well – or at least well enough so that I like what I paint.  It’s been a few years, though, since I last had my brushes and acrylics out.  The place we’re living in would be tough to set up a stained glass studio (I may still try!), but for now, paint might be my mode of creative retreat.

I came across a really fab website to get back into it – the Will Kemp Art Studio.  (I’ve linked it – you should check it out!)  Will Kemp is a talented artist and lovely gentleman who posts up many written tutorials, free videos and lots of helpful tips and hints about paints, mixing, palettes and materials.  What a dream!

So this afternoon, I decided to go for it and try out a painting tutorial – I picked the intro tutorial on a still life jug.  The image was posted up on Will’s website, and his three tutorial videos walked you through the painting in a very straightforward and friendly manner.  My favourite part?  The soundtrack to the third installment of this tutorial is a very delicate classical guitar cover of Katy Perry’s Teenage Dream!

So without further ado – here is the original image next to my acrylic version.  Not too shabby, and I’m pleased at how easy it was with the tutorial to guide me!

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Assemblages of our Discarded Past: Aaron Moran

I love a good post that focuses on design, art and building – all the things I do every day! An excellent post by and awesome blogger – if you haven’t already, please check out Artsy Forager on wordpress!

xo

Artsy Forager

I have always been a lover of things past.  Some of my favorite places have been cities or towns that truly celebrate their history, even revel in it.  To walk into a building that has been repurposed and restored is such a delight.  But it seems that more often than not, older buildings and homes instead of being loved and revered are neglected and then torn apart to make way for the shiny and new.  The sculptural work of Aaron Moran uses pieces of found architectural wood to create works that are as complex and chaotic as our history.

Each piece becomes a small monument to our collective history.  Just scraps might be affixed to repair a dying structure, so these scraps from buildings long gone are bound together physically in each work and spiritually in their shared destiny.

Instead of languishing at the bottom of a landfill, these relics…

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Making Waves

Marty and I are slowly getting our house set up, and one of the most exciting rooms in the new place is the spare bedroom, where I have grand plans for setting myself up a stained glass studio. Right now it’s holding all our ‘where do we put it?’ junk, so it’s a little crowded, but I did manage to get my tiny light table set up.  Now all I have to do is put the legs on the work table and get a drop cloth to go over the carpet and I’m ready to go!  Ok, so maybe it’s a little bit more set-up than that, but I’m close…

In my excitement for stained glass action, and also for summer, I wanted to share some inspiring stained glass waves.  I think the wave would be one of the more difficult images to capture well.  I can image getting all the aspects of the glass – the colour, texture, path of the lines – to come together and make the wave come alive and really portray the power and noise and motion and experience of a wave would be a complicated feat.  Hats off to the artists and their work below for really nailing the heart of waves in their stained glass pieces.

Jacqueline Winch Designs

This piece really captures the rolling curl of a wave collapsing over itself.  I love the subtle combination of clear, white and turquoise in this piece, and how the motion in the glass is really captured by the many textures.  I’ve seen the design done by other glass artists, but I really felt like this rendition of it picked up the motion and carried it all the way around the circular frame.  To see more of Jacqueline Winch’s work, visit her website here.

Atmospheric Glass

I really love the delicate lines of the wave in this piece.  The edges of each individual piece of glass in this window are so organic, as if the artist has merely drawn each line instead of cut and soldered them.  I think the colours are bold and give the viewer a clear definition of what is wave and what is background, and abstracts the motion of the wave into a ribbon of flowing movement.  The clear grid of glass for the ground really works and complements and contrasts the organic line and colour of the rest of this work.  See more of Atmospheric Glass here.

Mary Tantillo

Mary’s stained glass is organic, considered and – in a word – stunning.  This piece reminds me of waves, ocean eddies and seaweed all wrapped into one gorgeous image.  The differing and changing weight of each solder line creates a tension that pulls the viewer along each line toward the centre.  The colours flow from one to the next, and I love that the swirling lines intersect and support one another, creating very interesting opportunities for contrast through colour blocking.  I’ve seen all these colours in the ocean, and they all remind of me each memory – ‘that time swimming over the sand dollars’ or ‘that storm we had in November’ or ‘that summer we built the raft’…  In addition to this amazing work, Mary has also done a 100 Days of Waves project, which can be seen on her website here.

I have to say, my inspiration energy is running high after these lovely images.  I’ll be back to post more inspiration again soon, and will have details of upcoming projects as I start working again…  Can’t wait!

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