Tag Archives: reinforcement

Light Box Soldering Part I

So in my last post, I talked about some of the projects in which I’ve used reinforcing wires to add strength and support to the soldering lines, and I’ve started the process of adding in this support to my green and grey light box.  Here are a few photos to show you what I’m doing.  And don’t get me wrong, I’m making this up as I go along.  If anyone has suggestions for a better method, definitely let me know!

When planning where I want reinforcement, I thought about it in terms of adding strength, as well as providing a stop-gap for solder along all the edges of this lamp.  So I knew I need wire along every edge.  In the end, I decided to cut four pieces of wire and then bend them to fit — one piece of wire would start at the bottom of the lamp, run up a corner edge, run along one side of the top edge between the side and top panels, and then overlap about an inch back down the next corner edge.  I started with the one-inch overlap part, thinking it would likely be easier to fit a longer, more maneuverable piece of wire overtop of that piece afterwards:

Starting with the one-inch section on all four corners left me with long ‘arms’ that I would bend and solder as I went along:

Four pieces of wire

After placing in all four pieces of wire, I began to bend and solder them along the top edge, working one at a time.  I spot-soldered the edge to keep the wire in place.  The spot-soldering allowed me to bend the wire in each section to keep it as tight to the corner as possible and when I go back to add a finish solder bead along these edges, it will help keep the wire from popping back up as the solder melts along.  On the left corner, you can see where the wire I’ve just soldered and the wire intended for the next edge intersect:

Spot solder along the top edgeFrom there I bent the length of the wire to follow the side corner along to the bottom edge.  The point here is that it will overlap and help cover the next one inch section so that when I apply a finish solder bead, everything gets covered evenly.  I guess I will have to see how this theory will work out for my next post:

In the picture above, you can see a pretty sizeable gap between the side and top panel, and the wire helps add bulk to fill this in so that it’s not just solder doing this job.  From there, the wire that was just bent around the corner was soldered into the side-side edge, again as tight as possible.  The next wire (the one sticking out the right side of the photo) will be bent around to the side-top edge, the same way I’ve just described above.  And so on until all four sides are done.  Up next?  Adding a wire ring around the bottom edge and applying a finish solder bead to all the edges.

 

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Send In the Reinforcements

In my recent post about my green and grey light box project, I got to the point of having the panels spot-soldered soldered together and in a basic 3D form.  This post, I’m going to talk about my use of reinforcing wire in my projects, as that’s the next step for my light box project.  

Using reinforcement is something that I’ve started doing in my work partly from functional necessity and partly for aesthetics, although really the aesthetic aspect also adds function regardless.  The first lamp I added reinforcements to was the hanging lamp I designed and built for my mom.  I wanted some additional structure on the inside so that all the long strips would stay together and not pull apart (that’s a lot of straight lines).  I also wanted to add a wire reinforcement at the top and bottom edges to keep it in a circular shape.  There are four “circles” of support wire in this lamp: two at the top and bottom edges, and two that snake along (approximately) the top and bottom of the coloured squares, soldered to the inside of the lamp.

Lamp with Little Squares

The second lamp I used reinforcements in was the table lamp I built for my sweetheart. I needed to add a support that allowed me to add bulk and structure to the edges of the squares, as they didn’t fit perfectly together and I wasn’t keen on overlapping the edges very much — I wanted the corners to meet somewhat evenly.  I used reinforcing wire along the corner edges, sunken into the finish solder.  I also wanted to add some bulk to the finished edge at the top, instead of having a really flat, sharp edge.  So I used wire here too (wire everywhere!) to provide something to which I could adhere more solder and create a built up edge bead.

Prairie Gold Table Lamp

Since then, I’ve seen a few projects that have come back to me squished or broken, and have started incorporating wire into my smaller sun catchers (I’ve put support wire into these projects here and here).  They feel sturdier, and at least I know that someone really had to try hard to squish it if they return a project to me for repairs later!!

So that’s what’s up next.  I’m going to use a similar approach as the one I described for the table lamp above, but probably with a few extra pieces and some thinking about how to use longer pieces and bend them.  I’ll share an update and photos this weekend!

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