Tag Archives: repair

Up next – another light box

When I designed the light box I’ve posted about recently, I used the design twice to create one light box in moody, shady tones and one in brighter, sharper colours (pictured below in teal, bright green, iridescent and textured glass).  Based on my last experiences trying to solder the panels on the last light box together, and having it be a bit of a mess, I’ve decided to pull all the pieces apart, re-foil them and solder them again new.  A bit of a pain in the butt, but I’m aiming for better quality results over less total working time with this one anyways.

Here are all my glass pieces pulled apart:

The next step will be to remove the existing (old) copper foil, clean off any residues and foil them over again, the same way I described in this post.

After that, I will need to assemble my panels and put everything together.  I designed to top panel when I was working on the grey-green light box, but the design was a little bit different because I only had a few small scraps of remaining glass to work with.  I still like the way everything kind of swirls at the top, though:

Light Box Top Panel

More posts to come on how this project progresses!

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Panels Re-Do

*le sigh*

I started working on a couple of lamp panels several years ago (I think it is three years ago, although I am ashamed to admit that was the last time I had studio space set up…) and I recently pulled them out again to finish them as part of my goal to complete old projects before working on new ones…  Sadly, the copper foil oxidized and soldering the pieces together (over the old solder and bad copper foil) was just not going very well.

Oxidized copper foil

I decided I would pull all the old copper foil off, replace it with new foil and just start over.  {You can see the process for how I did this in my post on fixing up the hummingbird sun-catcher.}  Removing the copper foil was time consuming and annoying, especially so with several components of textured glass, but in the end it made soldering everything much easier, cleaner and produced better results.

This is the solder result from the panel that I just worked on soldering over as-is.  There was not as much oxidization on the copper foil as on the panel in the picture above, and I figured I could probably make it work:

Bad solder...

These solder lines didn’t melt as smoothly on the fixed-up panels – and the finish on it is kind of grainy and dull, like it tarnished faster than the solder on the panels where I replaced the foil.  Here’s what those solder lines look like:

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Ok, so maybe my photos aren’t quite the best…  But you can kind of get the idea that this solder line is smoother, plumper and shinier.  The soldering process went much faster as well because the copper foil was new, and everything was just happy to stick together.  After my first attempt to solder the original copper foil panels, I figured something a bit more intensive would be required to get the solder to bond to the copper without totally starting over — so I scrubbed everything down (old solder, recent solder, copper foil, glass) with a bit of soap and steel wool to clean the existing materials and rough-up the copper for a better bond.  It works – I got the rest of the solder lines onto the panels without too much trouble.

Up next?  Finishing the top piece of this lamp box and connecting all the pieces together!

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A Little Fixer Up’er

I made a series of sun-catchers for family members one year, and this little hummingbird was one of them.  Sadly, he got squished and his wings fell off!  *sad face*  So as something I can do to finish a variety of projects I started (before moving on to new ones), I thought I would work on fixing up this sun-catcher with some improvements!  I talked about some of the steps I could take to fix this piece in an earlier post, and here they are in more detail and with pictures.

Step One:  Removing the broken wings.  Luckily the glass isn’t broken – the copper foil has just been pulled off the edges of the glass.  To remove the wings, I pulled them off with my hands, breaking the copper foil to remove them from the pieces.  {Just a note – use your judgement when doing this.  If it will pull other solder seams or otherwise make more trouble for you to fix, just melt everything off gently with the soldering iron.}  Then I melted the solder in the joint between the wing and body, using the soldering iron to push the remaining foil out of the way.

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Step Two:  Remove the old copper foil from both wing pieces.  I used a small exacto knife to help me scrape the copper foil off all edges of the wings.

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Step Three:  Cleaning the glass.  There is a sticky residue left over from the copper foil around the edges of the wing pieces.  To clean them, I put them into a sink of warm water with a small amount of dish soap.   I let the soak for a few minutes, then used an old rag to wipe off the sticky stuff on the edges of the glass.  Good as new and ready to be re-foiled and attached back on!

Sticky residue on edges of glass

Step Four: Re-apply copper foil.  I’m using a 1/4″ copper foil, partly because I’m out of 7/32″ and partly because I want there to be a solid border around these wing pieces.  Going to 3/16″ is not a great option for single pieces that will be attached by only a single solder joint.

Foiled wings

Step Five: Attaching the wings back onto the body.  I thought about why these wings came off in the first place, and a lot of it has to do with the fact that there isn’t a whole lot of structural connectivity between the body and the plane of the wing.  It was very easy for the wing to be bent upwards or downwards, and for the copper foil to pull away from the glass.  So I’m going to use some thin wire to help create more stability.  I’ve started incorporating wire supports into my work to add structural integrity and strength, so I think it’s not a bad idea here.  I’m going to bring a piece of wire from the middle line of the body across the front edge of the wing, and the same thing on the back – a piece of wire running from the middle seam of the body across the back edge of the wing.

Step Six: Soldering it all together.  This process takes some time, and it would be amazing if I had a third hand to keep it all together.  If you’re thinking about getting into stained glass, be prepared to constantly cut and burn your fingers.  The first step to make this process much easier was to apply a layer of solder on all edges of the wings separately before adding wire or attaching them to the body of the hummingbird.

I chose to solder the wire all the way around the wings, both because it created a more consistent line around the wings, and just adds strength, which is the point of this fix.  I spot-soldered the wire first and then went over it again to add a smooth edge.

The last steps in reattaching the wings were to attach the wire to the body joint, and then to cover it all with a heavy line of solder.  This is where the earlier step of applying a thin coat of solder all the way around the edges really helps out – the goal now is to create joints between the existing solder instead of trying to get into some really tight spaces with a soldering iron to get everything coated.

Step 7: Clean the piece and VOILA!  Good as new!

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