Tag Archives: sun catcher

A Little Fixer Up’er

I made a series of sun-catchers for family members one year, and this little hummingbird was one of them.  Sadly, he got squished and his wings fell off!  *sad face*  So as something I can do to finish a variety of projects I started (before moving on to new ones), I thought I would work on fixing up this sun-catcher with some improvements!  I talked about some of the steps I could take to fix this piece in an earlier post, and here they are in more detail and with pictures.

Step One:  Removing the broken wings.  Luckily the glass isn’t broken – the copper foil has just been pulled off the edges of the glass.  To remove the wings, I pulled them off with my hands, breaking the copper foil to remove them from the pieces.  {Just a note – use your judgement when doing this.  If it will pull other solder seams or otherwise make more trouble for you to fix, just melt everything off gently with the soldering iron.}  Then I melted the solder in the joint between the wing and body, using the soldering iron to push the remaining foil out of the way.

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Step Two:  Remove the old copper foil from both wing pieces.  I used a small exacto knife to help me scrape the copper foil off all edges of the wings.

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Step Three:  Cleaning the glass.  There is a sticky residue left over from the copper foil around the edges of the wing pieces.  To clean them, I put them into a sink of warm water with a small amount of dish soap.   I let the soak for a few minutes, then used an old rag to wipe off the sticky stuff on the edges of the glass.  Good as new and ready to be re-foiled and attached back on!

Sticky residue on edges of glass

Step Four: Re-apply copper foil.  I’m using a 1/4″ copper foil, partly because I’m out of 7/32″ and partly because I want there to be a solid border around these wing pieces.  Going to 3/16″ is not a great option for single pieces that will be attached by only a single solder joint.

Foiled wings

Step Five: Attaching the wings back onto the body.  I thought about why these wings came off in the first place, and a lot of it has to do with the fact that there isn’t a whole lot of structural connectivity between the body and the plane of the wing.  It was very easy for the wing to be bent upwards or downwards, and for the copper foil to pull away from the glass.  So I’m going to use some thin wire to help create more stability.  I’ve started incorporating wire supports into my work to add structural integrity and strength, so I think it’s not a bad idea here.  I’m going to bring a piece of wire from the middle line of the body across the front edge of the wing, and the same thing on the back – a piece of wire running from the middle seam of the body across the back edge of the wing.

Step Six: Soldering it all together.  This process takes some time, and it would be amazing if I had a third hand to keep it all together.  If you’re thinking about getting into stained glass, be prepared to constantly cut and burn your fingers.  The first step to make this process much easier was to apply a layer of solder on all edges of the wings separately before adding wire or attaching them to the body of the hummingbird.

I chose to solder the wire all the way around the wings, both because it created a more consistent line around the wings, and just adds strength, which is the point of this fix.  I spot-soldered the wire first and then went over it again to add a smooth edge.

The last steps in reattaching the wings were to attach the wire to the body joint, and then to cover it all with a heavy line of solder.  This is where the earlier step of applying a thin coat of solder all the way around the edges really helps out – the goal now is to create joints between the existing solder instead of trying to get into some really tight spaces with a soldering iron to get everything coated.

Step 7: Clean the piece and VOILA!  Good as new!

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How To: Make a Reverse Pattern From Pieces You Cut Out Three Years Ago

So, I think the title says it all…  I have a lot of glass from projects that I cut out years ago and put in containers (I honestly did think I would work on them much sooner than this!) with the intent to put them together into something beautiful!  Alas, I did not put any record of how the pieces were supposed to fit together into the container with them…  Most of these containers have been puzzled over and eventually just abandoned into the scrap pile to be used for other projects at some future date.  But I did find one envelope that had a few clues to help me put it back together!

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The envelope contained 17 pieces, and had the label “butterfly” on the outside.  So far, so good.  I know what I’m supposed to be piecing together.  With the contents of the envelope emptied, the real fun begins.  Moving the green and white pieces around brings back a memory of a butterfly pattern I made in 2007 (!!), so that is some help.  I have an idea of how it is supposed to fit.  And at last, another clue clicks!  Some of the pieces are numbered!  And one of them is labelled with a number 1.  A starting point!  From there, it becomes clear that there are some white pieces designed to be squiggly edges of wings, and some that fit next to the butterfly body.  The green pieces just fall into place in between – and once one wing is laid out, the next is just a mirror image!  I think I just got lucky…

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I grind up my pieces to get the fit just right, and clean and foil them up – ready to go!  But then I realize that I don’t have a pattern (thanks, love of getting rid of things I haven’t used in years + moving at least four times since I cut this glass), and it would be nice to replicate this butterfly for future projects, as it’s actually quite cute!  So I assemble the pieces in their full shape and trace an outline onto a piece of paper.

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The next step is to clear the pieces and then trace each piece individually.  I started with the body, because it’s clear where that one is supposed to go, and the rest of the pieces can be traced out based on their relative positions.  Next I moved outwards into the wings, tracing the basic edges of each piece, and lining up the next piece against the newly traced lines.

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Once I traced all the pieces, I had a basic outline of the butterfly and all the components of the wings.  To finish off the pattern, I traced it out with a thick sharpie marker, to connect all the lines and to make it easy to copy this pattern on the light table in the future.

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After that, time to finish the butterfly!  I have to say it’s not my best solder work, but it’s been three years and then some, so it’s not a bad start…  I have a rheostat on my soldering iron, and think the temperature may need some adjustment.  But that’s neither here nor there.  I finished my first project in three years!  Fly little butterfly!

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This workspace is for workin’

It may not be the most perfect space, but it’s enough for me to be able to have some dedicated space to set up a light table that doubles as a grinder station, and a table surface that I can cut and solder on, so it works for now!  Sadie likes to hang out and keep me company, and remind me every few hours to take a break and pay attention to her instead…

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The last couple of days, I’ve pulled out all my tools, picked up a couple of pieces that I was missing (rubber tips for my running pliers) and started getting back into the swing of cutting some glass!  It’s been awesome, and I’ve only cut myself twice.  So far.  It feels good to be back into it, though.  The work is repetitive and kind of therapeutic for that reason.  I put on an album and just get in the groove – it’s a good feeling to focus on something and be fully absorbed for a couple of hours.  I feel like I don’t do that a whole lot in other areas of things I take on.  I have two goals for the next little while: the first is to use up some of the smaller pieces and scrap glass I have in my  possession.  So here is my next lamp project to start using some up some of this material:

Cutting out glass pieces

The second goal I have is to fix up a couple of broken pieces and complete some stuff I started working on a couple years ago (seriously, it’s been that long!)  Number one on my list was a pretty little butterfly sun-catcher I made in a class a number of years ago.  On of the wire antennas fell off, so time to solder it back on – a nice easy fix!  {As an aside – I highly recommend taking a beginner class to brush up on some skills if you’re a hobbyist or been doing it for a couple of years without any instruction.  I’ve been making glass projects for years and a class gave me a couple easy tips and tricks that helped clean my work up a lot!  Hmmm… Maybe a topic for another post?}  Asides aside, here is my good-as-new butterfly:

Glass Butterfly

 

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